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19 Apr 2018, 17:11 HRS IST
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SC says courts are not the place to settle business or political rivalry which has to be fought in markets or electionsThe PILs were without any truth and attempt was made to malign the judiciary: SCSC says it thought of initiating contempt proceedings against petitioners but decided not to go ahead with itSC says during arguments, counsel for petitioners forgot to maintain institutional civility towards judges and made wild allegationsSC criticises attempts by senior advocates and activist lawyers to make insinuations against judges including that of the apex courtSC says frivolous and motivated litigation has been filed to settle political rivalryIt becomes clear that with these petitions real attempt and frontal attack was made on independence of judiciary: SCDocuments placed on record and their scrutiny establishes that Loya's death was due to natural cause: SCThere is no reason to doubt statements of four judges on circumstances leading to the death of Loya: SCSC says attempts were made to scandalise judiciary by levelling serious allegations against judicial officers and judges of Bombay HCSC dismisses pleas to probe alleged mysterious death of CBI judge B H Loya, who was hearing Sohrabuddin Sheikh fake encounter case
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  • Cases of hepatitis B and C hit 325 million: WHO

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16:22 HRS IST

Geneva, Apr 21 (AFP) An estimated 325 million people are living with hepatitis B or C and few are aware of their condition, with death tolls from the viruses rising, the UN said today.

The World Health Organization's latest hepatitis report identifies the condition as a grave public health threat that needs an "urgent response."

Hepatitis killed 1.34 million people in 2015, a toll roughly in-line with HIV and tuberculosis.

But in contrast to HIV and TB, hepatitis deaths are increasing, WHO said, recording a 22 per cent mortality rise from 2000 to 2014.

Hepatitis is often symptom free, but types B and C can trigger liver cirrhosis and cancer if untreated.

Lack of awareness among those infected is driving the virus's spread.

For hepatitis B -- which is spread through bodily fluids like blood and semen -- only nine percent of those infected know their status.

And for hepatitis C, primarily spread through blood, just 20 per cent of those infected are aware of their condition.

Lack of access to testing and treatment leaves "millions of people at risk of a slow progression to chronic liver disease, cancer and death", WHO said in a statement.

The hepatitis B problem is most acute in the WHO's Western Pacific Region, which includes China, Malaysia and southeast Asia. An estimated 115 million people in the region have the virus.

Second worst is Africa, with 60 million hepatitis B cases.

An effective vaccine exists for hepatitis B.

WHO's latest data shows that hepatitis C -- for which there is no vaccine -- is most commonly spread through unsafe injections, notably among drug users.

Europe and the eastern Mediterranean region are afflicted with the most hepatitis C cases at 14 million and 15 million respectively.

WHO is trying to ramp up the global hepatitis response, aiming to treat some 80 percent of sufferers worldwide by 2030.

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