login
  • SUBSCRIBER
  • User Name
  • Password
  • Remember Me
ad
19 Apr 2018, 17:14 HRS IST
|
SC says courts are not the place to settle business or political rivalry which has to be fought in markets or electionsThe PILs were without any truth and attempt was made to malign the judiciary: SCSC says it thought of initiating contempt proceedings against petitioners but decided not to go ahead with itSC says during arguments, counsel for petitioners forgot to maintain institutional civility towards judges and made wild allegationsSC criticises attempts by senior advocates and activist lawyers to make insinuations against judges including that of the apex courtSC says frivolous and motivated litigation has been filed to settle political rivalryIt becomes clear that with these petitions real attempt and frontal attack was made on independence of judiciary: SCDocuments placed on record and their scrutiny establishes that Loya's death was due to natural cause: SCThere is no reason to doubt statements of four judges on circumstances leading to the death of Loya: SCSC says attempts were made to scandalise judiciary by levelling serious allegations against judicial officers and judges of Bombay HCSC dismisses pleas to probe alleged mysterious death of CBI judge B H Loya, who was hearing Sohrabuddin Sheikh fake encounter case
  • PTI
add
    • Health & Science
  • We may be hardwired to appreciate poetry: study
  •  Share
  • Print Print
  •  E-mail
  • Comments Comment
  • [ - ] Text [ + ]
  • London, Feb 19(PTI)
  • H

    uman brain may be hardwired to appreciate poetry even if it struggles to comprehend its meaning, a new study suggests.
     Researchers at Bangor University in the UK have demonstrated that we do indeed appear to have an unconscious appreciation of poetic construction.

    "Poetry is a particular type of literary expression that conveys feelings, thoughts and ideas by accentuating metric constraints, rhyme and alliteration," said Professor Guillaume Thierry at Bangor University.

    Researchers analysed whether we can appreciate the musical sound of poetry independent of its literary meaning.

    To address this question they created sentence sample sets that either conformed or violated poetic construction rules of Cynghanedd - a traditional form of Welsh poetry.

    These sentences were randomly presented to study participants; all of whom were native welsh speakers but had no prior knowledge of Cynghanedd poetic form.

    Initially participants were asked to rate sentences as either "good" or "not good" depending on whether or not they found them aesthetically pleasing to the ear.

    The study showed that the participants' brains implicitly categorised Cyngahanedd-orthodox sentences as sounding "good" compared to sentences violating its construction rules.

    The researchers also mapped Event-Related Brain Potential (ERP) in participants a fraction of a second after they heard the final word in a poetic construction.

    These elegant results reveal an electrophysiological response in the brain when participants were exposed to consonantal repetition and stress patterns that are characteristic of Cynghanedd, but not when such patterns were violated.

    Interestingly the positive responses from the brain to Cynghanedd were present even though participants could not explicitly tell which of the sentences were correct and which featured errors of rhythm or sound repetitions.

    "It is the first time that we show unconscious processing of poetic constructs by the brain, and of course, it is extremely exciting to think that one can inspire the human mind without being noticed!" Thierry said.

    The research was published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology.

  • Post your comments