Source Name : LumiraDx

Category Name : General

LumiraDx Launches Rapid Microfluidic Immunoassay C-Reactive Protein Test to Help Combat Antimicrobial Resistance in India

Updated: 24/11/2022

LumiraDx is focused on transforming community-based healthcare by providing fast, accurate and comprehensive diagnostic information to healthcare providers at the point of need, thereby enabling better medical decisions leading to improved outcomes at lower cost

Mumbai, Maharashtra, India (NewsVoir)

•  The LumiraDx CRP diagnostic test combines speed and test sensitivity at the point of need, empowering doctors to make informed decisions on antibiotic prescriptions 1,2,

•  The test provides actionable results to care providers at a variety of clinical settings including ICUs, paediatric departments, EDs, GPs, OPDs, and other clinical care settings across India

•  India ranks first globally among countries’ total consumption of antibiotics 3

•  Studies show that point of care CRP testing reduces antibiotic prescribing by 23-36% for respiratory tract infections (RTI)1, and 22% for COPD 2

LumiraDx Healthcare Private Limited, a next-generation point of care diagnostics testing company announced it has launched its highly sensitive C-Reactive Protein (CRP) point of care antigen test across India. The point of care CRP test can be used in multiple clinical settings to help reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescribing that leads to antimicrobial resistance. From a tiny sample of finger-prick blood, the CRP test gives results within four minutes on the portable LumiraDx platform which weighs just over a kilogram. 

Today’s announcement comes during World Antimicrobial Awareness Week (WAAW) which spotlights the increasing global burden of antimicrobial resistance. With the new antibiotic pipeline almost dry, reducing antibiotic prescriptions, managing patient compliance to treatment, and reducing self-medication are vital to alleviate the global burden of drug-resistant pathogens. Studies show that point of care CRP testing reduces antibiotic prescribing by 23-36% for respiratory tract infections (RTI)1, and 22% for COPD2. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) continues to be a high priority global issue 4,5 and there is a direct relationship between the prescribing of antimicrobials and the development of AMR. 6 

CRP testing can effectively help to reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescribing in primary care.1 

“India, one of the world’s most populated nations has greatly been impacted by antimicrobial resistance. The availability of the LumiraDx CRP Point of Care Antigen Test can help to ensure that antibiotics are only given to patients who will benefit from them,” said Yogesh Singh, LumiraDx General Manager, India. 

“Global emergence of antimicrobial resistant pathogens presents an urgent need for practical and innovative solutions to control and prevent the use of antibiotics, especially where unnecessary prescriptions, self-medication and poor compliance persist,” said Dr. Nigel Lindner, Chief Innovation Officer, LumiraDx, “Ensuring doctors’ access to crucial actionable CRP test results in care settings is a sustainable way to future proof our system against antibiotic resistance.” 

In India, CRP tests are available in ICUs, paediatric departments, EDs, GPs, OPDs, and other clinical care settings. The Government of India considers AMR a priority health issue and has undertaken a nationwide initiative by launching an AMR stewardship programme. 

More information on LumiraDx is available at www.lumiradx.com.  

References:

1. Cooke J, Llor C, Hopstaken R, Dryden M, Butler C. Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in primary care: narrative review of C reactive protein (CRP) point-of-care testing (POCT) and antibacterial use in patients who present with symptoms of RTI. BMJ Open Respir Res. 2020;7(1):e000624. doi:10.1136/bmjresp-2020-000624 

2. Butler CC, Gillespie D, White P, et al. C-Reactive Protein Testing to Guide Antibiotic Prescribing for COPD Exacerbations. N Engl J Med. 2019;381(2):111-120. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1803185 

3 . Neelam Taneja and Megha Sharma. Antimicrobial resistance in the environment: The Indian scenario. Indian J Med Res. 2019 Feb; 149(2): 119–128.

4. World Health Organisation (WHO). Global action plan on antimicrobial resistance, 2015.

5 O'Neill J. Tackling drug-resistant infections globally: final report and recommendations. London: HM Government and Wellcome Trust, 2016.

6. Goossens H, Ferech M, Vander Stichele R, et al. Outpatient antibiotic use in Europe and association with resistance: a cross-national database study. Lancet
2005;365:579–87. 

Image: Front Insert Render - CRP

(Disclaimer: The above press release comes to you under an arrangement with Newsvoir. PTI takes no editorial responsibility for the same.)